Showing posts with label Misc. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Misc. Show all posts

The Computer with its insides!!!


Top 10 predictions for the wireless industry


Originally from EE Times -- and followed by our reader comments

They are as follows:

1. High-speed downlink packet access (HSDPA), a third-generation cellular phone technology, will flourish.

Its a speculation. The infrastructure and inadequate popularity will push this to 2009.

2. The upcoming 700-MHz spectrum auction in the U.S. will provide an opportunity for a new wholesale carrier that will not sell services directly to consumers. This model will be driven by Google and similar companies, and will employ technology such as software-based radios, Wi-Fi, and femtocells.

This is also a speculation. I dont see any connection between 700MHz spectrum and software-based radios, Wi-Fi, and femtocells.

3. Open access and competition among chipmakers will drive device makers to bypass carriers. Open access will give birth to new services, but on the downside, subsidies that carriers currently provide on devices will be eliminated. There will likely be advertising-supported subsidies, meaning that instead of carrier contracts, consumers will have to agree to receive ads in order to get low-cost or free phones.

This is sure to be a reality.

4. With a move to Internet Protocol-based networks and open access, there will be an opportunity for real quality of service distinctions for carriers. On the low end, consumers will be able to bring their own devices to a carrier's network without receiving subsidies or the kind of support they currently expect by subscribing to carrier's services. On the high end, consumers can get high reliability, priority access, and quality of service guarantees on applications like voice over IP. Customers will self-select service based on their preferences, including the performance and the price they want.

This will be mainly dependent on the cloud comprising the government bodies, the service providers, the content providers and the customers. We have to wait and watch.

Verizon Wireless last month shocked the U.S. wireless industry, announcing that starting next year it will open up its nationwide network to mobile devices, software, and applications not offered by the carrier. The carrier said it will have two categories of customers: full-service customers -- those who purchase devices and services from Verizon and receive technical support, and bring-your-own customers -- those who bring their own devices to the carrier's network without full service.

This indeed will be a bold move if true.

5. Wireless broadband will continue to be the fastest-growing service. HSDPA will dominate until LTE goes commercial, and it will be embedded in laptops for wireless connectivity. Meanwhile, WiMax will be embedded in some consumer devices. As a result, the laptop market will get a boost because consumers will want to buy laptops that are better connected.

Skeptical.

6. Peer-to-peer will hit the mainstream as a technology. U.S. distributors will start using next-generation, secure, and DRM-protected P2P to distribute content. Additionally, studios and broadcasters will increase offerings of over-the-top services. Over-the-top refers to being able to download video on-demand and other content over the Internet on mobile devices.

There have been talks about this for a while but we dont think this will happen anytime in 2008.

7. Providing wireless coverage inside buildings will become a large part of carriers' strategy, especially when it comes to service enterprise customers. Carriers will enable coverage for their enterprise in-building customers, which bring in a lot of profit, instead of blanketing cities with coverage. Low-cost, low-power femtocells will be a key technology used by the carriers. Technical issues, however, will not take this technology into full swing next year. (Femtocells are small base stations designed for use in homes and offices to help spread cellular coverage inside buildings. They will attract more than 100 million users in the next 5 years, according to ABI Research. Potentially, the use of femtocells can improve indoor wireless coverage and help reduce "in-home" call charges on mobile devices.)

Very unlikely. Companies will still prefer their own private wireless networks.

8. As the carriers roll out 3G networks and introduce bandwidth-intensive services, they will have to optimize and upgrade the backhaul portion of their networks to ensure that service quality is not compromised. Backhaul will be a significant operational expense for carriers, often totaling nearly 30% of a carrier's annual network operating expense budget.

Quite possible.

9. Mobile advertising will drive content and innovation, even causing carriers to give up their subscription-based business models. Advertising-based models will win over subscription-based models, similarly to what happened on the Internet. Intelligent search, location-based search, and other tie-ins with content and products will generate sizeable advertising revenues for carriers.

Mobile advertising sales in the U.S. accounted for $421 million in 2006. That number is expected to reach nearly $5 billion by 2011 in the U.S. alone, according to market research firm eMarketer. Global mobile advertising sales will reach $11.3 billion by 2011.

Will happen.

10. A major iPhone security incident will occur in the enterprise, raising awareness of and need for mobile device security. A new market will evolve for mobile device security software and mobile device management software and services.

This is being very pessimistic.

Comments by Murugavel Ganesan

Glossary of EDA Terms