Showing posts with label Flipflop. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Flipflop. Show all posts

"Latch" Vs "Flip Flop"


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A flip-flop is Edge sensitive: Output only changes on rising (or falling) edge of clock.
A latch is Level sensitive: Output changes whenever clock/Enable is high (or low)

A common implementation of a flip-flop is a pair of latches (Master/Slave flop).

Latches are sometimes called “transparent latches”, because they are transparent (input directly connected to output) when the clock is high.

The clock to a latch is primarily called the “enable”.

For more information have a look at the picture below.








Deprecated Hardware:

Latches:
  1. Use flops, not latches
  2.  Latch-based designs are susceptible to timing problems
  3. The transparent phase of a latch can let a signal “leak” through a latch — causing the signal to affect the output one clock cycle too early
  4. It’s possible for a latch-based circuit to simulate correctly, but not work in real hardware, because the timing delays on the real hardware don’t match those predicted in synthesis
Flip-flops:
  1. Limit yourself to D-type flip-flops
  2. Some FPGA and ASIC cell libraries include only D-type flip flops. Others, such as Altera’s APEX FPGAs, can be configured as D, T, JK, or SR flip-flops.

  • For every signal in your design, know whether it should be a flip-flop or combinational. Examine the log file e.g. dc shell.log to see if the flip-flops in your circuit match your expectations, and to check that you don’t have any latches in your design.
  • Do not assign a signal to itself (e.g. a <= a; is bad). If the signal is a flop, use an enable to cause the signal to hold its value. If the signal is combinational, then assigning a signal to itself will cause combinational loops, which are very bad.
If you are looking for code snippets for following types of harware, please leave a comment.
  1. Flops with Waits and Ifs
  2. Flops with Synchronous Reset
  3. Flops with Chip-Enable
  4. Flops with Chip-Enable and Mux on Input
  5. Flops with Chip-Enable, Mux's, and Reset